Celtic myths come from more countries than i realized

Discussion in 'Celtic Mythology' started by Setharoth, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. Setharoth

    Setharoth New Member

    As I delve into the history of Celtic mythology, I was surprised to learn that this area covers more than just Irish folklore. I always thought it just referred to the Irish but I read that the legends also include tales from Wales, Scotland, Cornwall and Brittany.
    Toni likes this.
  2. Myrddin

    Myrddin Well-Known Member

    Ah, yes. There is Celtic Ireland, Celtic Scotland, Celtic Wales, and Celtic Britain. If you look at any online lists of Celtic deities, most of them will say which region of the British Isles they belong to, or come from (some of them are even listed under two or more).
  3. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    Many older books on Celtic myth mainly focused on Ireland and Wales, because they have the oldest written tradition.
    Happily, some newer books include the other Celtic nations.
    RLynn likes this.
  4. RLynn

    RLynn Active Member

    The Irish have a huge appetite for verbalization, be it singing, oration, writing (a large proportion of great writers for such a relatively small country), or just simple story telling. Don't forget: Ireland is the home of the Blarney Stone. :) It's not at all surprising that their myths have gotten a lot of publicity.
  5. Myrddin

    Myrddin Well-Known Member

    Do you know when kissing the Blarney stone started, or how and why? When my sister went to Ireland, she partook in that event.
  6. RLynn

    RLynn Active Member

  7. Setharoth

    Setharoth New Member

    The stories about the Blarney Stone may be mythological in nature but the stone itself is real. That's one thing I find fascinating about many of the Celtic myths and legends. Many of them have actual spots where you can see things, such as the stone. Someday, I'd love to visit the Emerald Isle and visit the Blarney Stone. I wouldn't want to kiss it, though.
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  8. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    I was at Blarney castle back in 1994. There was a large line of people waiting to kiss the stone. Our tour guide cautioned us to
    kiss it "by proxy." (Can you imagine how many people kiss it).
    There is a man there that helps you to lay on your back; evidently the stone is imbedded in a wall and your
    head has to hang under it in order for you to be in position so you can give the stone your oral lovin'.
    I did not bother, instead I wandered around the castle grounds, which were beautiful.
    An Irishwoman I met told me that braggarts in Ireland are often jokingly accused of kissing the Blarney stone.
    The stone is an interesting reminder of the importance of eloquence to the Celts.
    Ancient authors speak of a statue of Ogmios (the Celtic god of speech), with silver chains leading from his mouth
    and attaching themselves to followers. A persuasive speaker can inspire many.
    It's as if they knew back then that the pen is mightier than the sword. Or rather, since they had no written language, the
    word is mightier than...well, you know.
    Nadai likes this.
  9. Toni

    Toni Active Member

    Refering to the original thread here, my research into fairies, pixies and elfs in Celtic Mythology has taken me all over the UK and beyond. I was as surprised as you Setharoth. I thought that the Celts were exclusive to one geographical area, but they are not.
  10. Isis

    Isis Member

    I'm not a germaphobe, but the idea of kissing the Blarney Stone skeeves me out, simply because so many people have kissed it.

    As for Celtic legends, I tend to read the Irish ones the most, followed by the Welsh.
  11. Myrddin

    Myrddin Well-Known Member

    Yeah, I have to agree. I don't think I could kiss the stone either - too many other lips have touched it, the whole idea makes me uneasy.
  12. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    At one point the Celts were freakin' all over the place.
    As far as Asia Minor there were the Galatians.
    RLynn likes this.
  13. Toni

    Toni Active Member

    Evidently!! They must have been rather a nomadic people. I do get lost in their lifestyle and music and often think that I was born in the wrong time period. I then look at all my modern conveniences and say "NAH."
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  14. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    I think much of what we think of today as Celtic culture might be romanticized.
    I mean...Enya? Really!?
    The ancient Celts probably listened to a very different kind of music.
    They were also savage headhunters and never had a written language until missionaries taught
    them how to write using the Latin alphabet.
    Of course not that I think the Romans or Teutons were any less savage.
    The Celts also too had a unique style of beauty and understanding of the world, and when they learned to write they left
    us a literature filled with enchantment.
    Nadai and RLynn like this.
  15. RLynn

    RLynn Active Member

    ¶ That could be considered heresy by many Celtophiles, especially those of the feminist variety. Fortunately their politeness seems to be matching your integrity. :)
    ¶ I have tried several times to read The Mists of Avalon with an open mind, but alas, it just doesn't compute. :rolleyes:
    ¶ I am sympathetic with the mentality behind the distorted popular view of the Celtic culture. However, historical revisionism, no matter how well intentioned, is an intolerable abomination! :(
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  16. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    I actually think Enya is okay...in small doses.
    Very small doses.
    Tintsy weeny doses;)
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  17. RLynn

    RLynn Active Member

    I agree.
    I haven't heard her recently, but in some of her earlier songs she would make strange grunting noises that were really yucky. No, maybe that was Delores O'Riordan. I get female Irish vocalists mixed up.
  18. Myrddin

    Myrddin Well-Known Member


    I don't recall Enya ever grunting. Must be the O'Riordan gal.
  19. LegendofJoe

    LegendofJoe Active Member

    I love Isis too!!!
    I have a painting of her on papyrus that i purchased when I was in Cairo!
    Nadai likes this.
  20. Nadai

    Nadai Active Member

    [​IMG] I don't think I could trust that... being held above the ground on my back while my head hangs over a ledge to kiss a rock countless people have kissed before me. It'd be amazing to see but I don't think I'd have done it either.
    LegendofJoe likes this.

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